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Culturally and Linguistically Competency Transition UCEDD Tip Sheets
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Strategies to Incorporate the Voices of People with Significant Disabilities in UCEDD Information Gathering and Operation Native American Developmental Disabilities Needs Assessment cover Supporting Diversity in the Developmental Disabilities Network through Minority Partnership cover

Given the importance of needs assessments and other information-gathering to UCEDD planning and operations, it is critical that information be gained from a wide spectrum of individuals with disabilities and their families. For this report, we sought out strategies on how best to include the voices of people who many not have been typically included in UCEDD needs assessments or CACs and who, by the nature of their disabilities, face significant barriers to participation.

The purpose of the project was to provide Commissioner Sharon Lewis, Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD), with a snapshot of the AI/AN experience with DD in selected Tribal and urban American Indian communities. Specifically, the report provides information about the availability of services and support for individuals with developmental disabilities (DD) and their families, the needs of DD tribal members and their families, and tribal members' familiarity and contact with the DD Network agencies.

To promote diversity within the Developmental Disabilities Network, as well as address health disparities experienced by minority populations, the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AIDD) in 2009 awarded three-year partnership grants to two UCEDDs - the Center for Leadership in Disability (CLD) at Georgia State University, and the University of Southern California UCEDD (USC UCEDD) at the Children's Hospital of Los Angeles.

Cover for Preparing Fundable Grant Proposals: A Roadmap for Professionals

The purpose of this publication is to enhance the knowledge and skills of professionals and graduate students who compete for federal grants. The material is designed for individuals with no experience or only limited prior experience in seeking competitively-awarded, public funds from federal agencies.

This multimedia module is self-instructional and allows a student or professional to work through the material at their own pace. The content of the module is divided into two parts: part 1 is focused on generic grant writing principles and strategies and part 2 is devoted to making a compelling case or argument for your proposal idea.

The information presented is most relevant, in both form and content, to the fields of education, developmental disabilities, mental health, community psychology, and human and social services.